Handling a loved one's will after they have passed away isn't always simple, particularly if the estate is large or complicated. Many people may not have a clear understanding of what the job entails and, more importantly, they are not always aware of the financial and legal responsibilities that come with the role.

What will be expected of me?

As a personal representative, you are responsible for the correct distribution of a deceased person’s estate. This means you must correctly value the assets and debts, complete relevant Inheritance Tax forms, calculate Income Tax for the year of death and the period post-death, and set up any trusts that may be in a will.

There are a number of other complications that can arise when dealing with an estate, such as discovering missing beneficiaries or coming across foreign shares or funds. Additionally, processing delays at HMRC and the Department of Work and Pensions can have knock-on effects on what you're trying to accomplish. Personal representatives can be held personally liable for any errors or misdistribution, so it’s important that the estate is properly dealt with.

How can a professional help?

Dealing with a deceased person’s estate is not always straightforward, which is why some people will turn to a professional for help. Professional estate administration providers have the expertise to navigate any challenges that might arise and ensure that an estate is correctly distributed to beneficiaries.

A professional estate administration provider can help you understand what needs to be done following a bereavement. They can also take care of the estate administration on your behalf, lifting the legal and financial burden of handling a loved one's estate. Some providers will even take on the legal and financial responsibility themselves, removing stress at a time that may already be difficult.

If you are dealing with an estate or would like to find out more about appointing a professional estate administrator to deal with your own estate when the time comes, seeking advice may be beneficial.

Handling a loved one's will after they have passed away isn't always simple, particularly if the estate is large or complicated. Many people may not have a clear understanding of what the job entails and, more importantly, they are not always aware of the financial and legal responsibilities that come with the role.

What will be expected of me?

As a personal representative, you are responsible for the correct distribution of a deceased person’s estate. This means you must correctly value the assets and debts, complete relevant Inheritance Tax forms, calculate Income Tax for the year of death and the period post-death, and set up any trusts that may be in a will.

There are a number of other complications that can arise when dealing with an estate, such as discovering missing beneficiaries or coming across foreign shares or funds. Additionally, processing delays at HMRC and the Department of Work and Pensions can have knock-on effects on what you're trying to accomplish. Personal representatives can be held personally liable for any errors or misdistribution, so it’s important that the estate is properly dealt with.

How can a professional help?

Dealing with a deceased person’s estate is not always straightforward, which is why some people will turn to a professional for help. Professional estate administration providers have the expertise to navigate any challenges that might arise and ensure that an estate is correctly distributed to beneficiaries.

A professional estate administration provider can help you understand what needs to be done following a bereavement. They can also take care of the estate administration on your behalf, lifting the legal and financial burden of handling a loved one's estate. Some providers will even take on the legal and financial responsibility themselves, removing stress at a time that may already be difficult.

If you are dealing with an estate or would like to find out more about appointing a professional estate administrator to deal with your own estate when the time comes, seeking advice may be beneficial.

Handling a loved one's will after they have passed away isn't always simple, particularly if the estate is large or complicated. Many people may not have a clear understanding of what the job entails and, more importantly, they are not always aware of the financial and legal responsibilities that come with the role.

What will be expected of me?

As a personal representative, you are responsible for the correct distribution of a deceased person’s estate. This means you must correctly value the assets and debts, complete relevant Inheritance Tax forms, calculate Income Tax for the year of death and the period post-death, and set up any trusts that may be in a will.

There are a number of other complications that can arise when dealing with an estate, such as discovering missing beneficiaries or coming across foreign shares or funds. Additionally, processing delays at HMRC and the Department of Work and Pensions can have knock-on effects on what you're trying to accomplish. Personal representatives can be held personally liable for any errors or misdistribution, so it’s important that the estate is properly dealt with.

How can a professional help?

Dealing with a deceased person’s estate is not always straightforward, which is why some people will turn to a professional for help. Professional estate administration providers have the expertise to navigate any challenges that might arise and ensure that an estate is correctly distributed to beneficiaries.

A professional estate administration provider can help you understand what needs to be done following a bereavement. They can also take care of the estate administration on your behalf, lifting the legal and financial burden of handling a loved one's estate. Some providers will even take on the legal and financial responsibility themselves, removing stress at a time that may already be difficult.

If you are dealing with an estate or would like to find out more about appointing a professional estate administrator to deal with your own estate when the time comes, seeking advice may be beneficial.

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